Leigh Florist – Wedding Flowers, Flower Shop, NJ Wedding Florist, PA Wedding Florist, South Jersey Wedding Florist

   Leigh Florist is a boutique floral studio in South Jersey.  Our team provides full service floral design for everyday arrangements and events.  We specialize in wedding and event design and offer custom bouquet preservation.

We invite you to experience our fresh flowers, artistic designs, and friendly service!

Stop in or call us! 856.547.1090 Visit our website here

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Adriana & Kenneth

Adriana and Kenneth tied the knot last November at the luxurious Union Trust located in the Historic District of Philadelphia. Her garden style bouquet included burgundy, magenta and coral flowers and blush pink accent tea roses and greenery mixed into the colorful bouquet. Her colorful choice of blush and burgundy flowers popped against the bridesmaids lavender dresses and gave a classy vibe to an already exquisite space.

Landon Wise Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landon Wise Photography

Her colorful floral design choices dotted the space with Ivory, Peaches and burgundy colors and set a romantic tone for their wedding day. The reception featured alternating tall and low centerpiece designs in our gold rental vases. Filled with Ivory hydrangeas, peach and coral Free Spirit roses and burgundy and green-gray foliage. The gold accenting color of the vases and lanterns allowed the flowers to take center stage.

Landon Wise Photography

 

Landon Wise Photography

 

This entry was posted in News.

Elizabeth & Brian

Location: Normandy Farm, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania

Photographer: Tyler Boye Photography

Colors: Pale Blush & Peach, Pops of Lime Green, Hot Pink, Accents of White

With her wedding at Normandy Farm located in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania,  Elizabeth’s love of flowers shown throughout her wedding day. Her organic garden style with flowy blooms and lush greenery stood out from the natural surroundings and touched every aspect of her and Brian’s wedding day.

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Her bouquet featured blush and peach garden roses with white freesia dotted throughout.  Her soft color pallet was accented with bright pops of hot pink peonies & lime green hydrangeas  which were used as accents for the stunning outdoor trellis and airy garden centerpieces for the Silos Ballroom.

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Her bouquet featured blush and peach garden roses with white freesia dotted throughout.  Her soft color pallet was accented with bright pops of hot pink peonies & lime green hydrangeas  which were used as accents for the ceremony decor as well as the airy garden centerpieces for the Silos Ballroom.

 

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Sunflowers

When you think sunshine and flowers most likely your first thought is sunflowers.  They’re large, bright headed blooms make the sunflower one of the most recognized flower around the world.  Sunflowers originated in the Americas and Europe, and were then cultivated as a valuable food source for centuries.

Artists throughout history loved the sunflower’s unique splendor—those of the Impressionist Era were especially fixated on the flower.  You will often see photographs of wild sunflowers with their tall stalks stretched out trying to reach the sun.  The receiving of a sunflower means the feeling of adoration, admiration, and platonic love towards a person, such as a family member or friend.  It will give the feeling of positivity and strength. It would be a sure way to brighten up their day.  Aside from being beautiful and important symbolically, the sunflower is downright useful. Almost all varieties produce edible and good-tasting seeds with plenty of health benefits.

The sunflower was common in American Indian tribes in North America. It is said that the plant was cultivated by the American Indians in present day Arizona and New Mexico around 3000BC. Some experts say the sunflower was domesticated even before corn! Used in many different ways when it came to food, the sunflower was a significant food source to the American Indians. The seeds where ground up and used in flour for cakes, mush and bread. Some mixed them with vegetables and some ate them as a snack but cracking the shell and just eating the seed (like we do today).

Sunflowers were used for more than food purposes too, such as purple dyes, body painting and decorations. Parts of the plant were also used for medical purposes from snakebites to body ointments. Sunflower oil (from the seed) was used in the hair and on skin and the dried stalk of the flower was used as building material. The whole plant including the seeds was very often used in American Indian ceremonies. Who knew so much use could come from a flower?

Sunflowers are heavily used in wedding decor and personal flowers such as bridal bouquets and centerpieces.

Sunflower bridal arrangements by Leigh Florist

BE a BEE Keeper

Bees are an extremely important part of our Eco system.  Their pollination process is essential for the growth of flowers, plants and trees all over the world.

The European honeybee is the most common species, and the only species kept in America. They are just 1 species of 20,000 worldwide known species. North America is home to 4,400 bee species including social bumblebee colonies, solitary tunnel nesting bees and solitary ground nesting bees.

Honeybees are the only insect which stores food in excess.  The colonizing of bees is called bee keeping.  Tending to bee hives requires a lot of time and knowledge.  General maintenance requires periodic inspections during the warm months to make sure your queen is laying eggs, your workers are building up honey stores, and your colony has enough space to expand.

Bees are directly influenced by their environment.  Their behavior and success varies greatly across climates. Management time and style will depend on your climate, your hive style, and your particular bees. All colonies are unique, and each beekeeper will have a different experience.

There are 3 types of bees in the colony: The Queen, the worker bee, and the drone.  The queen is the most important bee in the colony, there is only one.  The queen will lay all of the eggs for the colony, “deciding” when to lay drones eggs, or workers eggs.  Worker bees are sterile females who do all of the foraging, feeding of young, honey production and storage, wax production, cleaning, and defending the hive against intruders.

The only male bees in the colony are drones. Their only purpose is to mate with virgin queens from other colonies. Once they mate, they die successful bees. Unsuccessful drones return to the hive to eat honey and pollen. Once swarm season is over, drones become a drain on resources inside the hive, and are evicted by workers.  Bee keeping is hard work, but rich in reward.  There are many bee keeping groups and clubs that you can join to learn more about the bees in your local area.

Stockton Seaview Wedding

This Stockton Seaview wedding was full of personalized touches and late summer flair!

We designed the centerpieces with locally grown flowers included sage hydrangea, sunflowers, dahlias, zinnias with lush eucalyptus.

 

Dress up your Ceremony

The ceremony is usually your guests first impression of your wedding so lets set the mood!  This is where a lot of photos will be taken of this special moment in your life, so how do you decorate? There are so many way to create the ultimate ceremony space.  It is amazing what flowers and a little imagination can do!

  • Doors

If you can find a set of old barn doors or historical weathered doors, you can drape a sheer fabric to soften and create a backdrop.  Have your florist create a beautiful garland or swag of flowers to accent.

  • Draping curtains

Whether you have a cozy indoor ceremony or a romantic outdoor setting, a simple way to create an altar is to drape fabric over branches of a large tree.  It’s romantic, simple, and with some added floral accents it will bring your garden wedding to life.  If you are working with an indoor space try an arch with draped fabric, florals and lights. Eye-catching and romantic!

  • Hanging a curtain of lights

Hanging lights is such a beautiful and romantic backdrop to your ceremony.  It will illuminate your event with a beautiful glow, and the pictures will be jaw dropping!

  • Flower or garland curtain

Create a backdrop with a curtain of flowers or have a simple, minimalistic look with greenery garlands. The things florists have down with flowers to create those soft and beautiful backdrops is amazing.

 

Stephanie & Jarrett at The Bradford Estate

Photos by Tiffany Atlas Photography

 

Roses Flower Curtain by Leigh Florist Weddings

 

Chic Rusitc Door Decor

http://shabbychicmagazine.com/wedding-decor-ideas/

Preserve Your Wedding Memories

We preserve wedding bouquets!  Feature your beautiful blooms in a custom framed shadow box with your wedding invitation.  This makes a great keepsake!

For more information, visit our website

Wedding flower shadow box – Photo credit to Sue B Photography

History of Boutonnieres

It’s no secret that most men aren’t really into flowers, especially wearing them. However, did you know a boutonniere is historically the manliest thing you are wearing as you walk down the aisle? If you’re the groom or even a groomsmen, you may be wondering about the flowers you may have to wear on the special day. You may feel silly wearing a flower especially if it’s a girly color like pink, but think about the big picture and how it connects you to your beautiful bride. It ties the two of you together in a special way on your wedding day.

If you read our History of corsages blog then you got a glimpse of where the boutonniere tradition comes from but let’s expand! Some believe that this tradition goes back to ancient Egypt and the Aztecs. They would wear certain colored blossoms to show their support for players who participated in sporting events.

Others believe that the tradition came from the battlefields of the civil wars in England where the bloom or bloom color signified friends or enemies from each other. Boutonnieres didn’t become popular on lapels until the early 19th century when fashions began to change. Bigger coats that folded over revealing the inside of a buttonhole, creating a lapel didn’t become popular until this time.

It is said that boutonnieres became popular for special occasions because flowers provided a perfume effect, warded off evil and disease.

Typically, the boutonniere the groom wears should be a bit different from that of his groomsman. Sometimes they are a fuller design or even a different flower of the same color. The blooms should be pinned to the left lapel of the tux or suit jacket. A good jacket will have a sturdy buttonhole to support the weight of the flower. Some flowers are heavier than others so you will need to make sure it is secured correctly. Most of the time the grooms boutonniere will match the bride’s bouquet and pull them together for a picture perfect look.

Boutonnieres by Leigh Florist

 

Preserved Bouquet Art

Floral Preservation Bouquet Art – a unique service offered by our team here at Leigh Florist!

For more information visit our website

Contact us with any questions: sales@leighflorist.com   (856)547-1090

 

preserved bouquet art – photo credit to Sue B photography