History of Boutonnieres

It’s no secret that most men aren’t really into flowers, especially wearing them. However, did you know a boutonniere is historically the manliest thing you are wearing as you walk down the aisle? If you’re the groom or even a groomsmen, you may be wondering about the flowers you may have to wear on the special day. You may feel silly wearing a flower especially if it’s a girly color like pink, but think about the big picture and how it connects you to your beautiful bride. It ties the two of you together in a special way on your wedding day.

If you read our History of corsages blog then you got a glimpse of where the boutonniere tradition comes from but let’s expand! Some believe that this tradition goes back to ancient Egypt and the Aztecs. They would wear certain colored blossoms to show their support for players who participated in sporting events.

Others believe that the tradition came from the battlefields of the civil wars in England where the bloom or bloom color signified friends or enemies from each other. Boutonnieres didn’t become popular on lapels until the early 19th century when fashions began to change. Bigger coats that folded over revealing the inside of a buttonhole, creating a lapel didn’t become popular until this time.

It is said that boutonnieres became popular for special occasions because flowers provided a perfume effect, warded off evil and disease.

Typically, the boutonniere the groom wears should be a bit different from that of his groomsman. Sometimes they are a fuller design or even a different flower of the same color. The blooms should be pinned to the left lapel of the tux or suit jacket. A good jacket will have a sturdy buttonhole to support the weight of the flower. Some flowers are heavier than others so you will need to make sure it is secured correctly. Most of the time the grooms boutonniere will match the bride’s bouquet and pull them together for a picture perfect look.

Boutonnieres by Leigh Florist

 

Preserved Bouquet Art

Floral Preservation Bouquet Art – a unique service offered by our team here at Leigh Florist!

For more information visit our website

Contact us with any questions: sales@leighflorist.com   (856)547-1090

 

preserved bouquet art – photo credit to Sue B photography

Hydrangea

If you have been invited to a wedding in the past couple of years, chances are you have seen the hydrangea flower in either the wedding centerpieces or even in bridal bouquets. If you are big on the meaning of flowers, hydrangea means love and admiration, making it a sought after flower by brides to-be.

Hydrangea was first cultivated in Japan, but they have recently found fossilized hydrangea in North America dating back millions of years. Hydrangea was not seen in Europe until the 18th century when a colonist brought the North American hydrangea plant over to England.

Today, hydrangea mainly grows in the Americas. Big hydrangea heads are many smaller blooms clustered together. The little star-shaped flowers grow along wooden stems and create a big, pompom shape, making them very versatile and very easy to use in arrangements.

The most common color of hydrangea is white, but they also come in a variety of colors; such as blue, red, pink, or purple. In hydrangea varieties, the exact color often depends upon the acidity or alkalinity of the soil. Acidic soils produce blue flowers, neutral soils produce pale cream petals, and alkaline soils result in pink or purple. They can also change color, or be bi-colored. All depending on how acidity is added or removed from the soil. Hydrangea is available all year round, making it great for any occasion you would like to celebrate!

Some brides often worry that if they choose hydrangea for their wedding flowers it will wilt easily.  If your florist sources the hydrangea from top quality sources and hydrates each bloom properly, you will have nothing to worry about.  They are a beautiful flower that will compliment any wedding arrangement.

Take a look at a past wedding we created which included hydrangea in the wedding bouquets and wedding centerpieces.

Alstromeria

Alstromeria is one of nature’s most exotic looking flowers, also known as Peruvian Lilies. It comes in a variety of shades and colors, making them a perfect choice for any occasion. The Peruvian lily represents friendship and devotion and come in a variety of colors making them an ideal match for any birthday, graduation, or a “just because” arrangement. A few of the most popular colors include shades of yellow, pink, orange, and white.  The Peruvian lily is a very long lasting flower that has multiple blooms on a single stem, making these a popular choice for designers to place in vases or bouquets.

Alstromeria is native to South America, but now grow all over the world.  It was brought to Europe in the 1800’s, by a Swedish Botanist.  Not long after his discovery of the Peruvian Lily, did the flower gain popularity among flower enthusiasts.  With their meaning of devotion and friendship people quickly started giving them as gifts to friends and family.

Tulip Garden arrangement by Leigh Florist featuring Peruvian lilies (Alstromeria). 

 

The Chinese Lantern Flower

Looking for a flower that will be eye catching and exotic for your arrangement or bridal bouquet?  Look no further than the Chinese Lantern Flower. These unique flowers have an almost papery texture to them and resemble the traditional Chinese lanterns. They come in colors of fiery reds and oranges. Nestled inside of the husk is a small berry.

Once it becomes ripe, the berry is edible. It has a refreshing and mild taste to it. The berries are often turned into sweets, jams and even dipped in chocolate. Chinese Lantern flowers are used in a lot of arts and crafts because they dry out very well. Some are even turned in amazing jewelry pieces.

The Chinese Lantern Flower offers the symbol of protection – the husk protects the tiny delicate berry inside. The colors of red and orange represents passion for life. Add a little flair to arrangements and bouquets these fun, unique blooms.

Photo Credit: Simply Beautiful World on Tumblr – http://simply-beautiful-world.tumblr.com/post/127104402557/chinese-lanterns

Our favorite fall flowers

Fall weddings can be very romantic with the warm color leaves sprinkling down from the trees in shades of burgundy, orange, yellow and rich red.  This makes the perfect backdrop for such an event.  There are very beautiful flowers that grow in the Fall.

Here are 5 of our favorite seasonal Fall blooms:

  1. Sunflowers

Sunflowers grow locally here in late Summer and Fall making them a budget friendly option.  Their bright sunny blooms bring a lovely accent to the deep rich red and orange Fall tones.

  1. Dahlias

These unique blooms are a favorite of many brides.  Their blooms range from small and delicate to a large dinner plate size bloom.  They come in a wide range of colors to compliment any wedding color.

  1. Mums

Mums are a great way to bring Fall into your wedding.  Using mum plants as altar arrangements adds a beautiful Fall touch to any wedding.  These blooms are available as both plants and fresh cut blooms.  They are available in a variety of bold and beautiful colors such as purple, burgundy, orange, copper and yellow.

  1. Celosia

Celosia comes in a light and airy “feathered” variety or “coxcomb” variety which resembles coral in the ocean.  Popular celosia colors are its dark burgundy, red, orange and fuchsia.

  1. Bi-colored rose

These roses are grown all year round, but really got the spot light during the fall. Popular fall roses are high and magic, or circus rose.  Its bright yellow and orange petals make them a true show stopper. They look amazing in all aspects of the wedding from centerpieces, bouquets, cake flowers and other décor.

Congratulations Ha & Robert <3

Ha & Robert

Hamilton Manor – Hamilton, NJ

Something Blue Wedding Photography

We are in love with this November wedding for so many reasons. At the first meeting with Ha, we had discussed a romantic garden style wedding with vibrant fall flowers with touches of pale blue. So much romance in the air along with the perfect collection of roses in bright red, bronze and gold caramel tones accented with draping eucalyptus foliage.  These ethereal organic garden bouquets were finished and detailed with long streamers from the bridesmaids dress fabrics. Love this!

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The ceremony began in the early evening at The Hamilton Manor in Hamilton, NJ. The romantic setting was magical with a candlelit aisle and scattered petals. The classic white pipe and drape back drop created a simple, understated intimacy.

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The reception room at The Hamilton Manor was gorgeous with hardwood floors and the ambient lighting. The centerpieces varied between low lush with pillar candles and tall designs on gold vases. The cakes were adorable, three miniature wedding cakes in blues and golds created perfectly. These photos are my favorite of the season! To see more amazing photographs visit www.somethingbluenj.com

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So happy to be a part of this special day!

Pantone Color Report For Fall 2016

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The top 10 fall colors of 2016, give you a feeling of relaxation, deep warmth, and make a vibrant statement.  The cool tones: Riverside, Airey Blue, and Shark Skin; give the feel of relaxation, constancy, and serenity. The earthy tones of Potter’s Clay, Dusty Cedar, and Warm Taupe have a radiating warmth that’s sure to keep you toasty on those chilly, fall days. Lastly, the pops of exotic colors: Aurora Red, Spicy Mustard, Bodacious, and Lush Meadow will have heads turning. We can’t wait to see what color Pantone picks for 2017!

Moon Flowers!

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Moonflower is one of the most romantic plants you can grow in the garden. It’s a statuesque, ideal evening-garden plant bearing large trumpet-shape flowers that unfurl in the evening (or on overcast days) and stay open until the sun rises. Some are sweetly fragrant when open, and they are actually a close relative of the morning glory. This beautiful plant is also very heat- and drought-resistant, and given the right soil and temperatures, they can continue to bloom in your garden every year. But beware, It’s quite poisonous, especially the seeds.

Is there Such Thing as Black Flowers?

To most people’s surprise there is a new trend sweeping modern brides. The color black! From the wedding dress to flowers, to bridesmaid dresses to invitations, making it a true black tie affair. Some brides choose to go a chic modern look, or choose to shake it up and go vintage in a 1920’s theme. It’s a great way to incorporate black into your wedding.

A question florists are asked by most of these trendy brides is, “Are there such things as black flowers?” Unfortunately there are no truly black flowers grown in nature. To achieve that true darkness of color, it would have to be dyed, but there is hope! Nature does provide some of the most beautiful dark blooms. For those who would like a black and white affair, there are white anenomes and white gerbera daisies, which have a black center, making the black stand out against their ivory blooms.

As for truly dark flowers, the colors, come in an extremely dark burgundy, and plum black. You can find these colors in such blooms as black magic roses, black plum dahlias, black jack tulips, deep plum mini callas, and many more. Contrary to belief, the famous flowers, the black dahlias, are not actually black, they are a deep rich burgundy. Theses deep colored beauties may not be black, but when placed in a bouquet or centerpiece these blooms give off the dark flower effect brides are looking for. These wonderful flowers may have you wanting to add a touch of the dramatic to your black tie affair.

black flower collage ballroom callas dahlias gerbs