Holiday Centerpiece Inspiration

Christmas is one of the happiest times of the year! Christmas decorations brighten up your home, making it warm and welcoming to family and friends. We sometimes get swept up in celebrating the holiday and go crazy with decorations. For those of us who need ideas to add some small details to brighten up their home, the upcoming trends for 2018 are all about simplicity.

  1. Metallics

Metallic containers such as silver, gold and rose gold create a beautiful finishing touch to your holiday arrangement.

 

2.  Bringing in the nature

Christmas greens, pine cones, birch sticks, and other accents make for a fun winter arrangement!

 

 

3. Ornaments and Candles

Ornaments add a shimmery touch to holiday centerpieces, and candles create warm illumination to your holiday table.

Sunflowers

When you think sunshine and flowers most likely your first thought is sunflowers.  They’re large, bright headed blooms make the sunflower one of the most recognized flower around the world.  Sunflowers originated in the Americas and Europe, and were then cultivated as a valuable food source for centuries.

Artists throughout history loved the sunflower’s unique splendor—those of the Impressionist Era were especially fixated on the flower.  You will often see photographs of wild sunflowers with their tall stalks stretched out trying to reach the sun.  The receiving of a sunflower means the feeling of adoration, admiration, and platonic love towards a person, such as a family member or friend.  It will give the feeling of positivity and strength. It would be a sure way to brighten up their day.  Aside from being beautiful and important symbolically, the sunflower is downright useful. Almost all varieties produce edible and good-tasting seeds with plenty of health benefits.

The sunflower was common in American Indian tribes in North America. It is said that the plant was cultivated by the American Indians in present day Arizona and New Mexico around 3000BC. Some experts say the sunflower was domesticated even before corn! Used in many different ways when it came to food, the sunflower was a significant food source to the American Indians. The seeds where ground up and used in flour for cakes, mush and bread. Some mixed them with vegetables and some ate them as a snack but cracking the shell and just eating the seed (like we do today).

Sunflowers were used for more than food purposes too, such as purple dyes, body painting and decorations. Parts of the plant were also used for medical purposes from snakebites to body ointments. Sunflower oil (from the seed) was used in the hair and on skin and the dried stalk of the flower was used as building material. The whole plant including the seeds was very often used in American Indian ceremonies. Who knew so much use could come from a flower?

Sunflowers are heavily used in wedding decor and personal flowers such as bridal bouquets and centerpieces.

Sunflower bridal arrangements by Leigh Florist

Preserved Bouquet Art

Floral Preservation Bouquet Art – a unique service offered by our team here at Leigh Florist!

For more information visit our website

Contact us with any questions: sales@leighflorist.com   (856)547-1090

 

preserved bouquet art – photo credit to Sue B photography

Hydrangea

If you have been invited to a wedding in the past couple of years, chances are you have seen the hydrangea flower in either the wedding centerpieces or even in bridal bouquets. If you are big on the meaning of flowers, hydrangea means love and admiration, making it a sought after flower by brides to-be.

Hydrangea was first cultivated in Japan, but they have recently found fossilized hydrangea in North America dating back millions of years. Hydrangea was not seen in Europe until the 18th century when a colonist brought the North American hydrangea plant over to England.

Today, hydrangea mainly grows in the Americas. Big hydrangea heads are many smaller blooms clustered together. The little star-shaped flowers grow along wooden stems and create a big, pompom shape, making them very versatile and very easy to use in arrangements.

The most common color of hydrangea is white, but they also come in a variety of colors; such as blue, red, pink, or purple. In hydrangea varieties, the exact color often depends upon the acidity or alkalinity of the soil. Acidic soils produce blue flowers, neutral soils produce pale cream petals, and alkaline soils result in pink or purple. They can also change color, or be bi-colored. All depending on how acidity is added or removed from the soil. Hydrangea is available all year round, making it great for any occasion you would like to celebrate!

Some brides often worry that if they choose hydrangea for their wedding flowers it will wilt easily.  If your florist sources the hydrangea from top quality sources and hydrates each bloom properly, you will have nothing to worry about.  They are a beautiful flower that will compliment any wedding arrangement.

Take a look at a past wedding we created which included hydrangea in the wedding bouquets and wedding centerpieces.

Alstromeria

Alstromeria is one of nature’s most exotic looking flowers, also known as Peruvian Lilies. It comes in a variety of shades and colors, making them a perfect choice for any occasion. The Peruvian lily represents friendship and devotion and come in a variety of colors making them an ideal match for any birthday, graduation, or a “just because” arrangement. A few of the most popular colors include shades of yellow, pink, orange, and white.  The Peruvian lily is a very long lasting flower that has multiple blooms on a single stem, making these a popular choice for designers to place in vases or bouquets.

Alstromeria is native to South America, but now grow all over the world.  It was brought to Europe in the 1800’s, by a Swedish Botanist.  Not long after his discovery of the Peruvian Lily, did the flower gain popularity among flower enthusiasts.  With their meaning of devotion and friendship people quickly started giving them as gifts to friends and family.

Tulip Garden arrangement by Leigh Florist featuring Peruvian lilies (Alstromeria). 

 

Custom Floral Preservation Art

Custom Floral Preservation Designs Available! We are reserving spots for 2018…

Visit our website for more information visit our website or contact us: sales@leighflorist.com     (856)547-1090

Preserved Flower Shadow Box – Photo Credit to Sue B Photography

How To: Make Your Own Terrarium

Create a Terrarium

Have you ever seen those plants or creative scenes in glass vases or jars and wondered what they were? Wonder no more! They are called terrariums! A fancy way to bring nature inside your home or office. They are very easy to take care of and easy to make!

Materials:

  1. A clear glass jar, vase, or bowl (or whatever interesting glass container you have on hand)
  2. Rocks, pebbles or recycled glass chunks
  3. Activated charcoal (sometimes called activated carbon)
  4. Potting soil appropriate for your plants
  5. Moss (optional)
  6. Figurines, sticks or decorative items (optional)
  7. Various small plants
  8. A scoop, spoon or shovel
  9. Scissors
  10. Gloves

Step 1.  Prepare the container –  A great and inexpensive place to get your container is at a thrift store.  Just make sure that you wash it thoroughly and remove all stickers from the container.

Step 2. Add a drainage layer – Once the container is ready, fill the bottom with rocks or pebbles. This is to create a drainage layer so water can settle and not flood the plant. The depth of the rocks totally depends on the size of your container, but aim for 1/2″ to 2″.

Step 3.  Add Activated Charcoal – This will help kill the bacteria from growing in your terrarium and killing your plants.

Step 4. Add soil – Place a layer of soil down next.  Be sure to get the appropriate bag depending on which plants you’re using. Add enough soil so the plants roots will have plenty of room to fit and then grow. Aim for a depth slightly greater than the height     of the plant’s pot.

Step 5. Plant – When taking plants out of their original containers, you will want to break off all the old soil clinging to the roots.  Feel free to trim some of the roots back.  Don’t worry they will grow back.  Continue placing your little plants in the container and try to keep them away from the edges. The leaves are likely to touch the sides but aim to keep them away as much as possible. Once your plants are in pack them down with more soil, so they are sturdy in the dirt.

Step 6.  Add Accessories – Now you are done planting.  Add in any decorative twigs, rocks, or moss to help complete the look.

Step 7. Clean and Water – More than likely a little bit of dirt has gotten on the side of your terrarium. Clean up the sides and give it a fresh shot of water. It doesn’t need to get soaked, just a couple shots of water should do it for a while. The trick with watering is to monitor the soil. If it looks dry, then it needs water, but you shouldn’t have to do it very often.

If you would like to order a mini globe terrarium from our studio, give us a call! (856) 547-1090

Mini Globe terrariums by Leigh Florist.

Bells of Ireland

Molucella laevis, more commonly known as Bells of Ireland, are viewed as a symbol of luck.  Their dramatic profiles make them one of the most recognizable flowers.  Bells of Ireland usually grow up to 2ft tall or higher.  It’s blooms, known as bells or calyx, are a beautiful shade of lime green.  They grow up the length of the stem, and help conceal its defense mechanism, of little white spikes, that can be sharp. So, handle with care! It is open to debate whether or not Bells of Ireland are a flower, or foliage. Contrary to belief, Bells of Ireland are native to the Mediterranean coast lines. They are a part of the mint family. These gorgeous blooms help give a modern flair to any arrangement.  They would be perfect in an arrangement to anyone who just bought a new house, or started a new job to wish them good luck!

The Anemone

The Anemone is a beautiful classic flower that has many uses from bridal bouquets to everyday centerpieces. The genus Anemone consists of 120 species of perennial flowering plants, which grow from tubers. Anemones grow wild in many European countries, North America, and Japan. The name Anemone is of Greek descent and roughly means wind flower because it’s the wind that opens them up. They were also once used for medical purposes as well. They have been known to help treat cramps and emotional distress.

The anemone comes several different colors such as red, pink, magenta, purple and blue, but the white anemone has proven most popular.

When it comes to wedding flowers the anemone is mostly used in the bridal bouquet. With its pure white petals and deep black center it creates a classic look on its own. You can also create a more dramatic look depending on what other flowers you pair them with. These flowers are typically available from October to May, only two of the major wedding months. If this is a flower you love and would like to incorporate into your wedding be sure to consider your time frame. Check with your local florist to inquire about their availability, and color options.