Soft, Bright & Beautiful

Photo Credit to: Asya Photography Venue: Estate at Eagle Lake

Danica and Jeremiah’s June wedding had a cheerful array of flowers from start to finish. Her bridal bouquet featured soft colors in blush shades, pale blues and white with light blue hydrangea, roses, tea roses, pale blue delphinium and, blue thistle accents for texture. These soft colors were used in the altar arrangements at the church. The bridesmaid’s bouquets featured white hydrangea with colorful pops of coral roses and tea roses and bright blue delphinium.

Photo Credit to: Asya Photography Venue: Estate at Eagle Lake

The wedding reception at the Estate at Eagle Lake in Chesterfield, New Jersey featured colorful table arrangements and centerpieces and like the bouquets of the bridesmaids featured bright pops of coral and blue flowers illuminated by tealight candles.  Greenery and gold foliage ran across the full length of the sweetheart table and long tables, illuminated by votive candles with clusters of small bottles filled with blooms mixed throughout the design. Round tables featured low organic centerpiece arrangements in cylindrical vases with blush, white, blue, coral flowers with gray, green and gold foliage to add texture and dimension, votive candles were also used to illuminate the arrangements.

Photo Credit to: Asya Photography Venue: Estate at Eagle Lake

 

Photo Credit to: Asya Photography Venue: Estate at Eagle Lake

 

Photo Credit to: Asya Photography Venue: Estate at Eagle Lake

 

Photo Credit to: Asya Photography Venue: Estate at Eagle Lake

 

Classically Blush Wedding flowers

This bride and groom’s flowers fit the elegant atmosphere of the Abington Art Center, located in Jenkintown PA. Her classical bouquet featured white hydrangeas and blush Sahara Roses with touches of burgundy peonies and plum scabiosa flowers. Greenery was kept to hints of eucalyptus and dusty miller.

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

The bouquets of her bridesmaids contained blush, white and soft pretty flowers with little greenery. The textures of the ivory tea roses, white hydrangea, and Queen Anne’s lace played against one another and highlighted Amanda’s bouquet as the focal point.

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

The boutonnieres were classic one rose style finished with minimal eucalyptus. Michael’s boutonniere featured a Vendella Rose to stand apart from the Sahara Roses of his groomsmen.

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

 

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

 

 

Inspired by the interior of the Alverthorpe Manor, blush, burgundy and ivory flowers adorned both the fireplace mantles in the main hall and the beautiful staircase. Rounded garden style arrangements  in tall cylindrical glass vases were the feature for the ceremony. Romantic low lush centerpieces with gold vases adorned the tables and hinted Amanda’ bouquet.

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

 

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

Photo Credit to: Ashley Gerrity Photography

Gonna be a Bright Sun-Shiny Wedding Day

Sunflowers give your bouquet a sunny fresh hand picked look. This Beautiful garden style bouquet contain sweet montecasino flowers and accents of dusty miller and  wheat. The perfect bouquet for summer or fall weddings or for when you need a little sunshine on your wedding day.

Photo Credit: Sophie Xu Photography

 

Photo Credit: Sophie Xu Photography

If you want boutonnieres that look like a sunflower but without the large scale consider using a viking mum instead. The hearty viking mum looks like a smaller version of a sunflower and will match the sunflowers in your bridal bouquet.

 

Photo Credit: Sophie Xu Photography

These rustic yellow and lush green arrangements pop against the navy blue staircase and barrels for a charming rustic scene at the Double Nickel Brewing Company.

Save the Bouquet!

Save the Bouquet! Your wedding is over, now what? Get your bouquet into our shop asap and we’ll start the process of preserving your wedding flowers.
We at Leigh Florist LOVE flowers, and we love preserving wedding memories. Our shadow box designs are heirloom quality and make a beautiful gift for your bride. When you are considering floral preservation there are a few things to keep in mind:

 

1. Keep your bouquet in water as often as you can during your wedding. After your wedding freshen the water in your vase trying not to wet the ribbon. You do not have to freeze or refrigerate your bouquet just keep it indoors and away from heat.

 

2. Get your bouquet to our shop the Monday or Tuesday after your wedding. The sooner the better so we can get to the flowers before mold sets in. We will thoroughly check each flower in your bouquet and let you know of there are any issues that would require replacements. We will let you know if replacements are needed and what their cost is.

 

3. The drying process takes approximately 8-10 weeks and during this time you can customize your order. If you haven’t already you can pick the frame, the Background, horizontal or vertical positioning and how you would like your dried flowers arranged (bouquet or surrounding the invitation.) You can add enclosures such as a wedding invitation, photograph or something sentimental. Check out our website: http://leighflorist.net/floral-preservation.html or pop by the store for ideas. We take floral preservation very seriously and hold ourselves to a very high standard. That is why we only allow our approved frames and backgrounds to be used. All of our frames are all made by hand, they are high quality wooden frames that will stand the test of time. The background mats we have available are the perfect choice for mounting flowers and other enclosures. We have chosen these mattes because the dry flowers adhere to them best.


5. Once dried we will arrange the flowers to your specifications, take a photo and send you the proof for your approval. Once you give us the green light we will complete your order.

And there you have it! Your bouquet.

 

Classically Colorful Wedding

This picture perfect wedding at the Knowlton Mansion was a day full of fun and flowers from start to finish. Cheerful colors were floral theme for this wedding as yellow, peach, pink, white and blue blooms were abound.

 

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

 

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

 

 

Draping greenery with free spirit roses, viking mums, sunflowers and hot pink stock adorned the corners of The beautiful walnut Chuppah.

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

Abundant with color the table arrangements varied from tall to short and looked fresh picked from the garden with flowers varying in size and color. These  centerpieces were fun and brought the beautiful reception space to life.

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

 

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

 

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

 

Photo Credit: Love Me Do Photography

 

A Bee and Its Flower

Bees and flowers have a lovely symbiotic relationship.  This means the relationship mutually beneficial for both parties involved.

The bees and flowers begin their bonding in late spring into the summer. This is when the bees are most active and the flowers start to bloom. As the bees travel from flower to flower, they pollinate each one. Their body picks up the pollen from each bloom which is then dropped onto each flower that it lands on after that. The bees do not intend to leave any of pollen behind because they are trying to get as much pollen back to their hives.  Pollen is the bee’s food source.

Bees also collect the nectar from the flowers. The nectar is a mixture of the plant sugar and water. This nectar provides the bee with energy to help them continue on their journey to collect pollen. Pollination of the flowers is very important. When a female flower is pollinated it helps process of making seeds.

Here is a list of ten flowers (according to Fafard: Science behind the art’s blog) that are best for bees.

  • Pale Purple Coneflower (early summer)
  • Common Yarrow (early summer)
  • Sunflower (summer)
  • Blue Giant Hyssop (summer)
  • Horsemint (summer)
  • Purple Coneflower (summer)
  • Black-eyed Susan (summer)
  • Aster (late summer early fall)
  • Joe-Pye Weeds (late summer early fall)
  • Golden Rod (late summer early fall)

Extra fun fact: Bees cannot see the color red, they tend to avoid red colored flowers.

Adriana & Kenneth

Adriana and Kenneth tied the knot last November at the luxurious Union Trust located in the Historic District of Philadelphia. Her garden style bouquet included burgundy, magenta and coral flowers and blush pink accent tea roses and greenery mixed into the colorful bouquet. Her colorful choice of blush and burgundy flowers popped against the bridesmaids lavender dresses and gave a classy vibe to an already exquisite space.

Landon Wise Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landon Wise Photography

Her colorful floral design choices dotted the space with Ivory, Peaches and burgundy colors and set a romantic tone for their wedding day. The reception featured alternating tall and low centerpiece designs in our gold rental vases. Filled with Ivory hydrangeas, peach and coral Free Spirit roses and burgundy and green-gray foliage. The gold accenting color of the vases and lanterns allowed the flowers to take center stage.

Landon Wise Photography

 

Landon Wise Photography

 

This entry was posted in News.

Elizabeth & Brian

Location: Normandy Farm, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania

Photographer: Tyler Boye Photography

Colors: Pale Blush & Peach, Pops of Lime Green, Hot Pink, Accents of White

With her wedding at Normandy Farm located in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania,  Elizabeth’s love of flowers shown throughout her wedding day. Her organic garden style with flowy blooms and lush greenery stood out from the natural surroundings and touched every aspect of her and Brian’s wedding day.

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Her bouquet featured blush and peach garden roses with white freesia dotted throughout.  Her soft color pallet was accented with bright pops of hot pink peonies & lime green hydrangeas  which were used as accents for the stunning outdoor trellis and airy garden centerpieces for the Silos Ballroom.

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Her bouquet featured blush and peach garden roses with white freesia dotted throughout.  Her soft color pallet was accented with bright pops of hot pink peonies & lime green hydrangeas  which were used as accents for the ceremony decor as well as the airy garden centerpieces for the Silos Ballroom.

 

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

Photo Credit to Tyler Boye Photography

BE a BEE Keeper

Bees are an extremely important part of our Eco system.  Their pollination process is essential for the growth of flowers, plants and trees all over the world.

The European honeybee is the most common species, and the only species kept in America. They are just 1 species of 20,000 worldwide known species. North America is home to 4,400 bee species including social bumblebee colonies, solitary tunnel nesting bees and solitary ground nesting bees.

Honeybees are the only insect which stores food in excess.  The colonizing of bees is called bee keeping.  Tending to bee hives requires a lot of time and knowledge.  General maintenance requires periodic inspections during the warm months to make sure your queen is laying eggs, your workers are building up honey stores, and your colony has enough space to expand.

Bees are directly influenced by their environment.  Their behavior and success varies greatly across climates. Management time and style will depend on your climate, your hive style, and your particular bees. All colonies are unique, and each beekeeper will have a different experience.

There are 3 types of bees in the colony: The Queen, the worker bee, and the drone.  The queen is the most important bee in the colony, there is only one.  The queen will lay all of the eggs for the colony, “deciding” when to lay drones eggs, or workers eggs.  Worker bees are sterile females who do all of the foraging, feeding of young, honey production and storage, wax production, cleaning, and defending the hive against intruders.

The only male bees in the colony are drones. Their only purpose is to mate with virgin queens from other colonies. Once they mate, they die successful bees. Unsuccessful drones return to the hive to eat honey and pollen. Once swarm season is over, drones become a drain on resources inside the hive, and are evicted by workers.  Bee keeping is hard work, but rich in reward.  There are many bee keeping groups and clubs that you can join to learn more about the bees in your local area.