Dress up your Ceremony

The ceremony is usually your guests first impression of your wedding so lets set the mood!  This is where a lot of photos will be taken of this special moment in your life, so how do you decorate? There are so many way to create the ultimate ceremony space.  It is amazing what flowers and a little imagination can do!

  • Doors

If you can find a set of old barn doors or historical weathered doors, you can drape a sheer fabric to soften and create a backdrop.  Have your florist create a beautiful garland or swag of flowers to accent.

  • Draping curtains

Whether you have a cozy indoor ceremony or a romantic outdoor setting, a simple way to create an altar is to drape fabric over branches of a large tree.  It’s romantic, simple, and with some added floral accents it will bring your garden wedding to life.  If you are working with an indoor space try an arch with draped fabric, florals and lights. Eye-catching and romantic!

  • Hanging a curtain of lights

Hanging lights is such a beautiful and romantic backdrop to your ceremony.  It will illuminate your event with a beautiful glow, and the pictures will be jaw dropping!

  • Flower or garland curtain

Create a backdrop with a curtain of flowers or have a simple, minimalistic look with greenery garlands. The things florists have down with flowers to create those soft and beautiful backdrops is amazing.

 

Stephanie & Jarrett at The Bradford Estate

Photos by Tiffany Atlas Photography

 

Roses Flower Curtain by Leigh Florist Weddings

 

Chic Rusitc Door Decor

http://shabbychicmagazine.com/wedding-decor-ideas/

History of Boutonnieres

It’s no secret that most men aren’t really into flowers, especially wearing them. However, did you know a boutonniere is historically the manliest thing you are wearing as you walk down the aisle? If you’re the groom or even a groomsmen, you may be wondering about the flowers you may have to wear on the special day. You may feel silly wearing a flower especially if it’s a girly color like pink, but think about the big picture and how it connects you to your beautiful bride. It ties the two of you together in a special way on your wedding day.

If you read our History of corsages blog then you got a glimpse of where the boutonniere tradition comes from but let’s expand! Some believe that this tradition goes back to ancient Egypt and the Aztecs. They would wear certain colored blossoms to show their support for players who participated in sporting events.

Others believe that the tradition came from the battlefields of the civil wars in England where the bloom or bloom color signified friends or enemies from each other. Boutonnieres didn’t become popular on lapels until the early 19th century when fashions began to change. Bigger coats that folded over revealing the inside of a buttonhole, creating a lapel didn’t become popular until this time.

It is said that boutonnieres became popular for special occasions because flowers provided a perfume effect, warded off evil and disease.

Typically, the boutonniere the groom wears should be a bit different from that of his groomsman. Sometimes they are a fuller design or even a different flower of the same color. The blooms should be pinned to the left lapel of the tux or suit jacket. A good jacket will have a sturdy buttonhole to support the weight of the flower. Some flowers are heavier than others so you will need to make sure it is secured correctly. Most of the time the grooms boutonniere will match the bride’s bouquet and pull them together for a picture perfect look.

Boutonnieres by Leigh Florist

 

Hydrangea

If you have been invited to a wedding in the past couple of years, chances are you have seen the hydrangea flower in either the wedding centerpieces or even in bridal bouquets. If you are big on the meaning of flowers, hydrangea means love and admiration, making it a sought after flower by brides to-be.

Hydrangea was first cultivated in Japan, but they have recently found fossilized hydrangea in North America dating back millions of years. Hydrangea was not seen in Europe until the 18th century when a colonist brought the North American hydrangea plant over to England.

Today, hydrangea mainly grows in the Americas. Big hydrangea heads are many smaller blooms clustered together. The little star-shaped flowers grow along wooden stems and create a big, pompom shape, making them very versatile and very easy to use in arrangements.

The most common color of hydrangea is white, but they also come in a variety of colors; such as blue, red, pink, or purple. In hydrangea varieties, the exact color often depends upon the acidity or alkalinity of the soil. Acidic soils produce blue flowers, neutral soils produce pale cream petals, and alkaline soils result in pink or purple. They can also change color, or be bi-colored. All depending on how acidity is added or removed from the soil. Hydrangea is available all year round, making it great for any occasion you would like to celebrate!

Some brides often worry that if they choose hydrangea for their wedding flowers it will wilt easily.  If your florist sources the hydrangea from top quality sources and hydrates each bloom properly, you will have nothing to worry about.  They are a beautiful flower that will compliment any wedding arrangement.

Take a look at a past wedding we created which included hydrangea in the wedding bouquets and wedding centerpieces.

Moon Flowers!

moonflower_full_bloom

Moonflower is one of the most romantic plants you can grow in the garden. It’s a statuesque, ideal evening-garden plant bearing large trumpet-shape flowers that unfurl in the evening (or on overcast days) and stay open until the sun rises. Some are sweetly fragrant when open, and they are actually a close relative of the morning glory. This beautiful plant is also very heat- and drought-resistant, and given the right soil and temperatures, they can continue to bloom in your garden every year. But beware, It’s quite poisonous, especially the seeds.

A Steampunk Wedding

A new trend for the quirky Bride, on the wedding scene, is Steampunk. Steampunk incorporates aesthetic designs inspired by 19th-century style with industrial steam-power. It is more than just Industrial pipes and grandma’s lace doilies. The ideas of classic, Victorian style with dark silhouettes, long sleeves, lace, high collars and hats, but with a twist. Mixture of Science, fantasy, and vintage style can make for one gorgeous and fun event. The amazing thing about steam punk is you can take it as far as your imagination

Steampunk reinvents these elegant stylings and gives them a somewhat futuristic design by envisioning the technology of the time using steam power or mechanics. If you’re a fan of Tim Burton movies, Sherlock Holmes, or Alice in Wonderland, this theme may be for you. You can go as bright or as gothic as you like, further down the rabbit hole. Steampunk colors consist of antique gold, brass, coppers, black and white, with pops or red or dusty mauve..the choice is yours.

Steampunk style centerpieces can be made of many things you find at an antique store, such as clocks, lamps, globes and quirky pieces, such as hourglasses, keys, gears, medicine bottles and magnifying glasses. It might not be a soft and subtle look for a wedding, but it will definitely add a certain edge and get guest’s heads turning.

 

The use of your imagination, rock, gothic, Victorian, vintage and a mix of futuristic that is steam punk. If you believe this style maybe for you, start going to antique shops and yard sales and collecting odds and ends that inspire your vintage steam punk style!

Steampunk Blog collage BeFunky Collage

Dahlias, one of nature’s truly unique flowers.

Nicked named “Tubers”, they are the national flower to Mexico. These fabulous blooms originated in South America and Mexico, in their mountain regions. One of the more hardy flowers to grow, as long as they are protected from wind, making the mountain range perfect protection. Now, mostly grown in North America in the Pacific North West, by farmers, these beauties make one hardy crop. They grow in between mid-summer to first frost, and take about 8 weeks to grow once planted. They need full sunlight, at least 6-8 hours.

The Dahlias bloom in a variation of sizes, from a 10”-12” dinner plate to a small 2” Lolli pop size. Their wide range of colors include red, pink, white, orange, yellow, purple, and many more. Some of the species may have bi-colored stripes, while others may have a variation of color just on the tips of the petals. Contrary to popular belief, there are no black dahlias, they are actually a deep burgundy color.

Florist use dahlias for almost every kind of celebration, while they are in season. The flower meaning of Dahlias is it that they are a symbol of an everlasting union, which make them great choices for engagements, weddings, and anniversary.

Visit our website HERE for fresh seasonal arrangements available for delivery.

Or view our wedding flower portfolio to see our weddings featuring dahlias.

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Zinnias – The true sign of late summer on the East Coast

Scientific name: Zinnia elegans

History: First discovered as a wildflower by Dr. Johann Gottfried Zinn, a German botanist, who took it back to Europe and started crossbreeding it with other zinnias, making hybrid variations, of the flower.

Meaning: the zinnia flower has several meanings including thoughts of friends, endurance, daily remembrance, goodness and lasting affection. Attracts Butterflies

Origin: strong, drought tolerant sun loving flower that is originally from southwestern United States, Mexico and Central America.

Season: In warmer areas with long growing seasons.

Growing: Zinnia flowers are one of the easiest plants grow, and bloom heavily. Zinnias are annuals, so they grow for one season and make great cutting flowers. They grow well in window boxes, and containers. Zinnias are grown from seed; they grow very quickly in the right conditions. Zinnias do not like to be transplanted.

Colors: many shades of red, orange, yellow, white, pinks, lilac and even lime green.

Variations: the zinnia flower can be as small as one inch across or as large as seven inches across.

Stop in for a bouquet of locally grown Zinnias, available now through October.

zinniasLeighStyledShoot-141

Lovin’ Local Flowers

We love this time of year when our local flower farmers arrive with their homegrown beauties. The freshness of these flowers is amazing! We love that local flowers don’t arrive on a jumbo jet. They are fresh picked the same day or just the day before delivery. They last a lot longer in the vase too!

Flower farming is an art in patience, hope, forethought and intention. We notice that our farmer friends are smart planners and even scientist. They work with and against the weather including too much rain or not enough.

This is a refreshing change from the 80% of flowers sold in the US are actually grown thousands of miles away. Most are grown in Colombia, Ecuador, Thailand, and Kenya.

Local flowers are usually grown organically or with very minimal chemicals, and grown in a field, rather than a greenhouse, where the natural rain and sun support their growth.

The bees, butterflies and birds in the fields go on to pollinate nearby food crops.

Please support local farms whenever possible!

Below are a couple of farms who provide our flowers:

Muth Family Farm

Formisano Farms

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Photo credit : Ashley Gerrity Photography

Sarah & Josh – The Inn At Barley Sheaf Farm

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The Inn At Barley Sheaf Farm is a very cute and comfortable bed and breakfast  located in Holicong, PA.  As you drive down a long dirt road, nestled among over 100 acres of preserved farmland and forests, the Inn at Barley Sheaf Farm is a true historic and hidden gem of  Bucks County. Sarah and Josh are a very sweet couple and we wish them lots of love and joy on the road to happily ever after.

Photographer – Emily Wren Photography

Florist – leigh Florist

Venue – The Inn At Barley Sheaf Farm

Happy Spring Weddings!

With Spring only 10 days away, we thought we would share some seasonal wedding inspirations!

 

1

 

White and lavender lilac, white roses, dusty lavender roses and eucalyptus, create a rustic garden style bouquet that smells fabulous!

 

 

2

 

A bold, bright combination of anenomes, ranunculus, dahlias and colorful seasonal accents, make the perfect bouquet to create a “pop” of color against the bride’s dress. Perfect for pictures!

 

3

 

This is a sweet garden bouquet featuring ranunculus, anenomes and fever few, in soft shades of peaches and white.

 

4

 

Succuluents add an interesting texture to any bouquet.  These gray-green succulents create a subtle contrast against the yellow craspedia.  The white ranunclus, fever few and ivory stock, soften the colors with accents of seeded eucalyptus.

 

 

What are some of your favorite spring flowers?