Easter Lily

Easter-Lily-Collage

Easter Lilies are a symbol of Hope, peace, and tranquility.  The large, trumpet-shaped, fragrant white flowers are mainly grown in the United States. The meaning of Easter is about the resurrection of Christ.  The Easter lily’s re-birthing from their bulb, year after year, and its bright white blooms symbolizes His resurrection. Making the Easter Lily a meaningful gift for the holiday that is highly regarded as a joyful symbol of beauty, hope and life.

Those pretty indoor Easter lilies are really hardy perennials, so don’t throw them out after the Easter holiday has passed, plant them outdoors to beautify your landscape instead.

Prolonging Indoor Bloom

To prolong bloom time indoors, be sure to pinch off the yellow anthers as soon as the flowers open.  This prevents pollination (un-pollinated flowers last longer), and keeps the flowers white.  Daytime temperatures in the 70’s and nighttime temperatures in the 40’s will also prolong bloom time.  Warmer temperatures negatively impact bloom time.

Preparing for Outdoor Bloom

If grown indoors as a houseplant, it’s difficult to get an Easter lily to re-bloom, but if planted outdoors, they readily re-bloom each year.  To prepare for planting outdoors (once your Easter lilies flowers have faded) remove all of the plant’s flowers.  This forces the plant to enlarge the bulb rather than producing flower seed.   Then, keep it in bright, indirect light until nighttime temperatures stay above 40 degrees outdoors.

Planting Outside

Plant it about 6 inches deep, in a partially-sunny site with well-drained soil.  Cover with several inches of mulch in cold winter areas  for winter protection. Easter lilies planted this way should bloom mid-summer next year.

Read the whole article on Better Hens And Gardens 

Easter Flowers and Tablescapes

Easter falls at the time of year when the cold, harsh winter is finally wiped away by the warm, blossoming days of spring. It is a time when a wide variety of flowers begin to bloom again, but one flower in particular is known as the Easter flower: the Easter Lily.

Originally cultivated in Japan, Americans began to grow lilies during the second world war. The lily has roots in the bible as the flower that sprang from the blood drops of Christ. It is also said that the white flowers bloomed in the tomb of the virgin mother, signifying her purity. In depictions of St. Michael telling Mary that she is to bear the son of God, he is often seen handing her a bouquet of white lilies. They are said to represent love and hope and their sprouting in the spring represents Christ’s resurrection, bringing purity back to the land.

Other popular flowers associated with Easter include daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, and irises. Daffodils represent rebirth and are said to have bloomed during Christ’s resurrection. In Germany, they are called Osterglocken meaning Easter bells and in England, they are called Lent Lilies. Tulips represent great love. They aren’t directly associated with Easter but are often associated with the idea of Christ’s endless love. Hyacinths are perhaps most famous for their fragrance; a light and sweet scent reminiscent of warm, breezy days. Just like the lily and daffodil, the hyacinth represents rebirth. The iris, which comes in an array of colors, symbolizes faith, hope, and wisdom.

On their own or mixed with other blooms, these flowers make beautiful gifts for loved ones and can be used to decorate your home during the Easter season. One of our favorite ways to decorate for the holiday is to make Easter tablescapes. They don’t have to be big or flashy or expensive. Flowers in soft pastel shades reflect the gentleness of the season while bright, happy colors are perfect for adding cheer to your table. This is also a great time to display bulbs as centerpieces. If you do want something grand or dramatic, arrangements with long blooming branches or pussy willow are compelling while also maintaining a soft aesthetic. The season of rebirth is full of fresh foods and flowers and we love decorating our homes with them to chase away any remaining winter blues.

While it is officially spring according to the calendar, it never really feels like spring until Easter rolls around. The bright colors and fragrant blooms that are always incorporated into Easter décor are what really make the season come to life. Here are a few of our favorite Easter floral designs:

Sweet and Pretty

Sweet and Pretty

Spring Waltz

Spring Waltz

Spring Bling

Spring Bling

Country Morning

Spring Awakening

Country Morning

Country Morning

LF-262

 

-Lacey Bouchard

 

http://www.ehow.com/facts_5188760_types-easter-flowers.html

http://www.theholidayspot.com/easter/easter_flowers.htm

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/lily/lily.html

http://www.proflowers.com/guide/history-and-meaning-of-iris