New Year’s Eve Wedding Bash!

Ali Goodman & Joe Correale New Years Eve Wedding

Venue – The Hyatt Morristown 

Photography –  David E Starke Photography

What a celebration! This vintage glam event in Morristown, NJ was a classic. In proper New Year’s fashion we used white, black, silver and gold. To create the designs we used hundreds of white roses, hydrangeas and Hawaiian orchids. Lots of candles illuminated the room and shimmered the gold glittered runners. This wedding was full of special details including the gold alarm clocks set for 12:00! Metallic balloons and streamers over the dance floor transformed the room. As the ball dropped the ceiling rained confetti! What a way to ring in your new beginning. 

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Rachael and Jason – The Downtown Club, Philadelphia

Rachael and Jason

April 2015 – The Downtown Club Philadelphia

Photographer: Olya Vysotskaya Photography

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Event colors: Black Tie with Lavender, blush and Ivory

Flowers Used: Hydrangea, tea roses, blush and lavender roses and stock

Style: Classic Pretty

Rustic Glitz Wedding – Maggie & Dane

Maggie and Dane hosted a great wedding in Chestnut Hill at The Cricket Club Philadelphia. The vibe was laid back but elegant and their event style was Rustic with a splash of Glitz.  The flowers chosen were simple and classic whites using hydrangeas, garden tea roses, queen anne’s lace, accent foliage and a few gray succulents to add interest.
 We incorporated a lot of special details into this wedding to decorate the cricket clubs four rooms and fireplaces. We used tree slices, wooden table numbers, and lots of candles and a touch of glam with the glitzy gold sequin runners.
We created custom chalk signs for the event. Starting in the main entrance we had a hand scripted seating chart and a welcome sign with their initials. In the cocktail space we had a sign directing people to the Photo Booth with our prop signs and also Instragram sign with their custom hash tag.
We are so happy to have been a part of such a wonderful wedding!!
Congratulations Maggie & Dane!
Thank you to Ralph Deal for sharing these beautiful photographs with us! www.ralphdeal.com
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Congratulations Erin & Daniel!!

Best wishes, Erin and Daniel, for a wonderful life together!  It was a pleasure working with you!

Ceremony Location: Incarnation Church – Mantua, New Jersey

Reception Location – Hotel Monaco – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Photographer – JPG Photography

Take a look at some of the photos we captured during the wedding setup…This place is GORGEOUS!  Erin and Daniel picked some really great centerpieces to tie everything together for their special day!

 

At the Incarnation Church, we draped sheer fabric down the aisle.  The ends of the pews were accented with tall cylinder vases with pillar candles and petals.

At the Incarnation Church, we draped sheer fabric down the aisle. The ends of the pews were accented with tall cylinder vases with pillar candles and petals.

Wedding Centerpiece_Phaildelphia Wedding Flowers_Dahlias_Hydrangea_Sedum_Dusty Miller_Mercury Glass

Blush and white blooms were scattered down the cake.

Blush and white blooms were scattered down the cake.

Wedding Centerpiece_Phaildelphia Wedding Flowers_Dahlias_Hydrangea_Sedum_Dusty Miller_Mercury Glass

This centerpiece was created in a low mercury bowl - filled with blush and white blooms with cool gray foliage to accent.

This centerpiece was created in a low mercury bowl – filled with blush and white blooms with cool gray foliage to accent.

Half of the centerpieces included silver lanterns and small mercury vases with loose blooms in blush pink and white.  Erin loves dahlias, hydrangea and other seasonal blooms.

Half of the centerpieces included silver lanterns and small mercury vases with loose blooms in blush pink and white. Erin loves dahlias, hydrangea and other seasonal blooms.

The Altar steps were decorated with silver lanterns that were filled with petals and pillar candles.

The Altar steps were decorated with silver lanterns that were filled with petals and pillar candles.

Nicole and Stephen – June 2013

Congratulations to Nicole and Stephen!

You two had such beautiful weather on your wedding day!

Venue: Congress Hall – Cape May, NJ

Photographer: Artwork Photography

Wedding Planner: Michelle Scanzano – All Things Beautiful

 

The men's boutonnieres included white garden tea roses and silver grey pods to accent.

The men’s boutonnieres included white garden tea roses and silver grey pods to accent.

 

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Nicole's bouquet included garden roses, garden tea roses, hydrangea and peonies.

Nicole’s bouquet included garden roses, garden tea roses, hydrangea and peonies.

 

Sara & Harry – June 2013

A big congratulations to Sara and Harry!  We wish you all the best!

Photographer: M2 Photography – A big thank you to Melissa McManus for providing their beautiful photos!

Venue: Trump National Golf Club – Pine Hill, NJ

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Nicole requested very pale peach tones, ivory/white and pops of coral shades. Her bouquet included roses, calla lilies, japonica, and small tufts of foliage to accent.

 

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Harry wore a calla lily boutonniere while his best man and groomsmen wore rose boutonnieres.

 

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Sara’s petite toss bouquet!

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

We created tall centerpieces with pale yellow, lime green, oranges, and pale pink using viburnum, hydrangea, roses, lisianthus and other seasonal blooms. We paired these tall arrangements with low lush arrangements to match.

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

For her bridesmaids, Sara chose bright shades of corals and bright greens to accent. The bouquets were made of roses and cymbidium orchids with foliage to finish.

Philadelphia Wedding Photography

Jen & Dave – July 2013

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Jen’s bouquet was arranged with pale peach blush roses, light green hydrangea, white stock and other seasonal blooms.

We just got back from a setup at the Cescaphe Ballroom in Philadelphia for Jen & Dave’s wedding!

 

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A low lush design of hydrangea, tea roses, sweet william and garden foliages includes a cylinder vase with curly willow and a floating candle.

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Tall garden style center pieces of hydrangea, roses and other seasonal blooms with hanging clematis vines for an added touch :-)

Tall garden style center pieces of hydrangea, roses and other seasonal blooms with hanging clematis vines for an added touch 🙂

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A trio of submerged orchids with curly willow swirled in the vases and a floating candle to accent each vase.

A trio of submerged orchids with curly willow swirled in the vases and a floating candle to accent each vase.

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‘Blushing Bride’ Hydrangea (PPAF)

‘Blushing Bride’ Hydrangea (PPAF)

The Next Endless Summer Hydrangea


In 2003, Endless Summer Hydrangea was introduced by Minnesota’s Bailey Nurseries and blew the gardening industry away! It blooms on both old and new wood for repeat-blooming color all season long. Since Endless Summer was introduced, three more repeat blooming hydrangeas have been introduced by Zelenka Nurseries – ‘Forever & Ever’, ‘Forever & Ever Double Pink’ and ‘Forever & Ever Red.’ Now, Bailey Nurseries is introducing an Endless Summer derivative – ‘Blushing Bride.’ This, the fifth of the new repeat blooming hydrangeas, each one distinctly different, was bred from Endless summer by Dr. Michael Dirr, our nation’s preeminent woody plant authority. It will have only limited availability this spring.


White Blooms Repeat Throughout the Season


The blooms produced by ‘Blushing Bride’ are pure white, maturing to a blush pink or blue, depending upon your soil acidity. It has glossy, deep green foliage. ‘Blushing Bride’ has even faster re-bloom that its parent, Endless Summer. In addition to repeat blooms, ‘Blushing Bride’ Hydrangea is unusually hardy, at least through Zone 5.


‘Blushing Bride’ has the incredible repeat blooms that we love. Hydrangeas macrophylla always set their buds reliably in the fall, but these hydrangeas tend to go into the winter with soft and tender tips and that’s where the buds are located. Even if the buds survive the late fall frost and winter cold, they start to grow early in the spring and are subject to late spring freezes. As normal Hydrangea macrophyllas do not produce flower buds in the spring and summer, if and when these fall-produced buds die (or are eaten by deer), there will be no bloom that year. On ‘Blushing Bride’, flower buds are formed not only in the fall, but also in spring and summer. As the ‘Blushing Bride’ grows, it is continuously forming buds that will flower all season long. Prompt removal of the faded blooms will encourage new growth and even more new blooms.


Planting and Care


‘Blushing Bride’ Hydrangea will mature at four feet tall by four feet wide, perhaps a little larger. Unlike other Hydrangea macrophyllas which can only be pruned just as the flowers fade, ‘Blushing Bride’ can be pruned at any time – although late summer is probably still preferable. ‘Blushing Bride’ prefers moist soil (not wet) in a place with afternoon shade and morning sun. It makes an excellent choice for foundation planting, as a specimen and in shrub or perennial borders.



For best results plant in early spring to late summer.

Plant in well-drained soil. If you desire blooms that age to soft blue, add iron sulphate or garden sulphur; use lime for blooms that age to pink.

Performs best in moist, but not wet, soil. Add Soil Moist if you think the soil is too dry.

Plant so the top of the root ball is a half inch below the surface of the soil.

Prefers an area with morning sun and afternoon shade.

Use a handful of fertilizer at planting and again in early December and early March.

For blooms that will age to blue, use Leaf Gro compost at planting and fertilize with Holly-Tone.

For blooms that will age to pink, use Chesapeake Blue Crab Compost at planting and fertilize with Bulb-Tone.

Hardy in zones 5 to 9.

Click here to view Blushing Bride Hydrangea on the Carroll Gardens website.

Alan Summers, president of Carroll Gardens, Inc., has over 30 years experience in gardening and landscape design. He has made Carroll Gardens one of America’s preeminent nurseries, having introduced more than 20 new perennials and woody shrubs over the years and reintroduced numerous “lost” cultivars back to American gardeners.

Carroll Gardens publishes a weekly online newsletter written by Alan. It contains valuable gardening advice and tips and answers to customer questions. Click here to sign up for the Carroll Gardens weekly enewsletter.

Every Saturday, Alan hosts a call-in gardening forum on WCBM radio – 680 AM. For those outside of the WCBM listening area, they can listen to radio show via the internet.

Visit CarrollGardens.com to learn more.

Hydrangea Planting Guide

Hydrangea Planting Guide

With hydrangea planting, you first need to choose what type of hydrangeas you wish to plant. There are many different varieties, all of which grow to different heights, work better in some areas, than in others, and require different levels of care.

For the most part, you will find hydrangeas very large and beautiful plants. With hydrangea planting determine the area you wish to plant, this will help you in determining the specific plant you want in regards to height. You can expect a hydrangea to grow anywhere from four to twelve feet tall, so you want to take this into consideration when planting.

Furthermore, choosing the site is probably the hardest thing about hydrangea planting. You have to be really careful of where you choose to plant your hydrangea. First, consider the amount of sunlight the area gets, as well as when it gets the most sunlight. Most hydrangeas thrive in areas that receive partial to full sunlight. Performance is at its best when the plant receives full sun in the morning hours and shade during the afternoon areas.

Next, look for an area in which the plant will be protected from wind. In an area that experiences high wind the foilage will dry out and cause extensive stress on the hydrangea. Because hydrangea planting is one of the easiest and requires the less fuss, you can relax knowing the the plant can grow in many different types of soil. However, you do want to check the soil and make certain it remains moist and is prime for a plant. You will have no problems in growing the plant itself in soil with lower pH levels, however, you will find that the soil itself can have a direct impact on the bloom color.

Hydrangea Planting – When To Plant

The most beneficial time of the year to plant hydrangeas is during the early months in the fall season. You should case out the area you wish to plant and make sure you place compost in the soil mixture. Know the size of your root ball, this will help in determining the width of the hole you need to dig. You should dig a hole that is about twenty-four inches wider than that of the root measurement.

Hydrangea Planting – Care

Hydrangeas require relatively little fuss. You may need to prune the plant lightly to ensure a healthy plant. Fertilization is recommended on a twice yearly basis, once in the latter part of the fall season and once during the early part of spring. It is recommended when fertlizing, that you use a slow release compound. Be sure you do not over fertilize the plant or you may find that you have beautiful foilage, but little to no flowering.

Lee Dobbins write for Backyard Garden and Patio where you can get more guides on planting different types of flowers.

Hydrangea Care Awareness

Hydrangea Care Awareness

This is a favorite shrub with many gardeners because of their vine-like shoots and their eye-catching blossoms. Most hydrangeas originate from Asia and North America. Hydrangea macrophyllia are the big leaved and common along the Atlantic border states. They have big, beautiful blossoms of blue, lavender and white. More common is the hydrangea paniculata or panicle hydrangea. Then there’s the climbing hydrangea or Hydrangea anomola-petiolaris which is often seen on the northern sides of buildings and homes.

Hydrangeas blend nicely with rhododendrons, azaleas and the forsythia. When you plant them near each other you can almost bet you’ll always have something in bloom. Depending on the variety they’ll bloom from summer to autumn.

Your blossom color is relevant to the Ph level in your soil. Acidic soil will bring you blue to violet flowers, while neutral to slightly alkaline will give you pink to white. They can range in sizes from 5-10 inches in diameter.

Hydrangeas prefer light to medium shade although the big leaved can handle full sun provided they’re given enough water. They like moist soil but will do well in most soil conditions. They do better with at least 1.5 inches a week and 2 during the heat of the summer. Ease up on water early September to October as not to encourage fall growth. Give them one last good soaking before it freezes to supply shallow roots some moisture before winters dryness.

Hydrangeas really only require one feeding of fertilizer in the spring. A good compost or rich manure is really all that’s necessary but they’ll benefit from monthly feedings for up to three months. I’d go May to July in the south and June to August in the north. Liquid seaweed extract is best or any organic fertilizer will do. If you choose chemical fertilizer use a slow release. If you’re not sure how much to use it’s safer to use too little than too much. Pour around the drip line of the shrub; not near the base.

Pruning always brings best results after flowering has occurred. Big leaved hydrangeas get their flowers from buds of the previous growing season. Prune about a third of the weakest growth early in the spring. This will ensure new growth and encourage flowering.

Of course with flowers as big and brilliant as the hydrangea, pests will be attracted to them. There are many common insects that migrate to the hydrangea and these are discussed at great length at The Little Green Apple dot com. Look for the “articles” section on the right hand side of the home page. You’ll find some of the most common insects as well as diseases and controlling methods at the conclusion of the article.

 

http://www.thelittlegreenapple.com

http://www.thelittlegreenapple.com/articles/Hydrangeas.html

 

Dan Ezell is a long time lawn and garden enthusiast. He has 28 years experience in lawn and garden care from regions of South Florida to Northeast Ohio. His knowledge and unquenchable thirst for information will be displayed and constantly updated throughout the pages of The Little Green Apple dot com.