History of Boutonnieres

It’s no secret that most men aren’t really into flowers, especially wearing them. However, did you know a boutonniere is historically the manliest thing you are wearing as you walk down the aisle? If you’re the groom or even a groomsmen, you may be wondering about the flowers you may have to wear on the special day. You may feel silly wearing a flower especially if it’s a girly color like pink, but think about the big picture and how it connects you to your beautiful bride. It ties the two of you together in a special way on your wedding day.

If you read our History of corsages blog then you got a glimpse of where the boutonniere tradition comes from but let’s expand! Some believe that this tradition goes back to ancient Egypt and the Aztecs. They would wear certain colored blossoms to show their support for players who participated in sporting events.

Others believe that the tradition came from the battlefields of the civil wars in England where the bloom or bloom color signified friends or enemies from each other. Boutonnieres didn’t become popular on lapels until the early 19th century when fashions began to change. Bigger coats that folded over revealing the inside of a buttonhole, creating a lapel didn’t become popular until this time.

It is said that boutonnieres became popular for special occasions because flowers provided a perfume effect, warded off evil and disease.

Typically, the boutonniere the groom wears should be a bit different from that of his groomsman. Sometimes they are a fuller design or even a different flower of the same color. The blooms should be pinned to the left lapel of the tux or suit jacket. A good jacket will have a sturdy buttonhole to support the weight of the flower. Some flowers are heavier than others so you will need to make sure it is secured correctly. Most of the time the grooms boutonniere will match the bride’s bouquet and pull them together for a picture perfect look.

Boutonnieres by Leigh Florist

 

Hydrangea

If you have been invited to a wedding in the past couple of years, chances are you have seen the hydrangea flower in either the wedding centerpieces or even in bridal bouquets. If you are big on the meaning of flowers, hydrangea means love and admiration, making it a sought after flower by brides to-be.

Hydrangea was first cultivated in Japan, but they have recently found fossilized hydrangea in North America dating back millions of years. Hydrangea was not seen in Europe until the 18th century when a colonist brought the North American hydrangea plant over to England.

Today, hydrangea mainly grows in the Americas. Big hydrangea heads are many smaller blooms clustered together. The little star-shaped flowers grow along wooden stems and create a big, pompom shape, making them very versatile and very easy to use in arrangements.

The most common color of hydrangea is white, but they also come in a variety of colors; such as blue, red, pink, or purple. In hydrangea varieties, the exact color often depends upon the acidity or alkalinity of the soil. Acidic soils produce blue flowers, neutral soils produce pale cream petals, and alkaline soils result in pink or purple. They can also change color, or be bi-colored. All depending on how acidity is added or removed from the soil. Hydrangea is available all year round, making it great for any occasion you would like to celebrate!

Some brides often worry that if they choose hydrangea for their wedding flowers it will wilt easily.  If your florist sources the hydrangea from top quality sources and hydrates each bloom properly, you will have nothing to worry about.  They are a beautiful flower that will compliment any wedding arrangement.

Take a look at a past wedding we created which included hydrangea in the wedding bouquets and wedding centerpieces.

Wedding Roses

May of 2017 at the Abbie Holmes Estate in Cape May Court House, NJ.

Photos By: Jessica Cooper Photography

The Abbie Holmes Estate is the perfect setting for weddings with its beautifully manicured gardens and natural surroundings it is sure to make your wedding memorable.

The bride’s bouquet consisted of a gorgeous combination of peach and lavender roses in a small cascade shape. Her bridesmaids carried a small bouquet of similar colors consisting of white hydrangea, peach roses and small purplish blue accents. Having more white in the bridesmaids bouquets allowed the flowers to really pop against their dresses and the opposite effect for the bride in her stunning white gown.

Jessica Cooper Photography

Erin & Kevin

Erin and Kevin said their I Do’s on a beautiful day in Philadelphia, PA. Erin’s crystal beaded gown sparkled in the sunlight and was complimented by her bouquet of soft pink and white blooms. Kevin wore a white bloom with greens to match his bride. The reception took place at the Crystal Tea Room in Philadelphia where the tables were decorated in  soft neutral colors with pinks and greens to accent. Floating candles and tealights were added for a romantic candle lit atmosphere.

Photos by: Juliana Laury Photography
Venue: The Crystal Tea Room – Philadelphia, PA

The Anemone

The Anemone is a beautiful classic flower that has many uses from bridal bouquets to everyday centerpieces. The genus Anemone consists of 120 species of perennial flowering plants, which grow from tubers. Anemones grow wild in many European countries, North America, and Japan. The name Anemone is of Greek descent and roughly means wind flower because it’s the wind that opens them up. They were also once used for medical purposes as well. They have been known to help treat cramps and emotional distress.

The anemone comes several different colors such as red, pink, magenta, purple and blue, but the white anemone has proven most popular.

When it comes to wedding flowers the anemone is mostly used in the bridal bouquet. With its pure white petals and deep black center it creates a classic look on its own. You can also create a more dramatic look depending on what other flowers you pair them with. These flowers are typically available from October to May, only two of the major wedding months. If this is a flower you love and would like to incorporate into your wedding be sure to consider your time frame. Check with your local florist to inquire about their availability, and color options.

Jamie & Daniel -Sheraton, Society Hill Philadelphia

This was a pretty wedding designed with a simple garden flowers in lavender and blush. Jamie loved succulents, so we added a few into her mix of hydrangea, garden roses, dahlias, eucalyptus, and sweet touches of Queen Anne’s lace. These giant balloons are an awesome photo prop! So fun and lovely!

Photo credit: Asya Photography

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Amanda & Paul’s Please Touch Museum Wedding

Amanda’s  Hollywood inspired vintage glam wedding with a hint of Great Gastby!
She wanted to support local farms and use as much as possible. Her blush and red flowers looked great with all of her metallic accents. We used locally grown dahlias, hydrangea, lisianthus and hanging amaranthus. We loved her creativity and thought it was a great reflection of her personality.
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Ceremony- St Vincent Palotti Church – Haddonfield
Reception: Please Touch Museum – Philadelphia
Photography by: George Street Photography
Wedding Planning by: Kyle Michelle

Vanessa & Balal – April 2014

Vanessa and Balal had a beautiful spring day for their wedding at Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens in Philadelphia Pennsylvania.  This mosaic garden is an amazing, eclectic venue in the city! Vanessa loves purple! Her bouquet was a cascade style of four different variations of Orchids and Ivory Roses. Thank you Michael Chadwick for sharing these beautiful photos with us!

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2014 Wedding Flowers

In a few months, the 2014 wedding season will be in full swing. Now is the time for brides to begin planning the flowers for their big day. Now that we know what colors to expect, it’s time to consider what flowers will look elegant in the colors of the new year. The Knot claims that the best 10 wedding flowers are roses, tulips, calla lilies, lily of the valley, hydrangea, peonies, ranunculus, stephanotis, sweet peas, and gardenias. These are excellent and classic flower choices, but there are so many other options out there that also come in the projected shades of 2014.

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Peonies, roses, and hydrangea look lovely in coral. But other flowers such as snap dragons, spider flowers, and dahlias give texture that really make the already bold shade stand out. For more texture, hypericum berries also come in coral.

Another popular color for 2014 is yellow, specifically in happy, sunny shades. The most obvious choices for a bride who wants cheerful yellow flowers are sunflowers and gerbera daisies. But alstromeria, cymbidium orchids, cremon, irises, and dahlias also come in golden shades. And for even more yellow, mimosa and craspedia add lots of fun texture.

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Pantone’s color of the year, Radiant Orchid, is a brilliant shade of purple. Hyacinth, irises, dahlias, and crocuses also come in very lovely shades of purple. And of course, orchids are available in shades of purple ranging from warm pinky-fuchsia to cool blue-lavender.

Dahlia Bouquet, Wedding Bouquet, Bridesmaid Bouquet, Wedding Flowers, NJ Wedding Flowers, Philadelphia Wedding Flowers, South Jersey Wedding Flowers

While the selection of bright green flowers is slim, there are options such as cymbidium orchids, hydrangea, and chrysanthemums that will satisfy any bride trying to incorporate non-foliage green into her arrangements. However, there is a plethora of foliage options to lend texture and help create a variety of styles so don’t discount it! Also, if you want to go with a less traditional, bohemian style, limes look great in arrangements or submerged in vases.

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For the bride who wants to use the dazzling blue shades of 2014, delphinium, clematis, morning glory, and aster are all great choices especially since these flowers are naturally blue. Many flowers such as blue roses are not found in nature and are therefore produced artificially.

For our brave brides who want to use tangerine as their dominant color choice, proteas, dahlias, orchids, and gerbera daisies all come in the resplendent shade.

Kim Forrest, one of the editors for Wedding Wire, predicts that dahlias will be a very popular flower for 2014. Lucky for us, it is a beautiful and versatile flower with a fun texture that comes in many different shades.

No matter your style or color scheme, we can find a way to incorporate the color and flower trends of 2014 into your wedding flower assemblage!

 

-Lacey Bouchard

Leigh Florist – Wedding Flowers, Flower Shop, NJ Wedding Florist, PA Wedding Florist, South Jersey Wedding Florist

   Leigh Florist is a boutique floral studio in South Jersey.  Our team provides full service floral design for everyday arrangements and events.  We specialize in wedding and event design and offer custom bouquet preservation.

We invite you to experience our fresh flowers, artistic designs, and friendly service!

Stop in or call us! 856.547.1090 Visit our website here

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