How to make your own Terrarium

Terrariums are a cool way to bring nature inside your home or office.  They are a cute decoration on any table or desk.  Terrariums are easy to take care of and require very minimal watering.

Materials Needed:

  • A clear glass jar, vase, bowl, or glass
  • Rocks, pebbles or recycled crushed glass
  • Activated charcoal (sometimes called activated carbon)
  • Potting soil appropriate for your plants
  • Moss (optional)
  • Figurines, sticks or decorative items (optional)
  • Various small plants

Step 1.  Prepare the container

A great place to get your container is the thrift store.  Just make sure to wash it thoroughly and remove all stickers from the container.

Step 2. Add a drainage layer

Once the container is ready, fill the bottom with rocks or pebbles. This is to create drainage layer so water can settle and keep the plant from flooding.  The depth of the rocks depends on the size of your container, but aim for 1/2″ to 2″.

Step 3.  Add Activated Charcoal

This will help keep the bacteria from growing in your terrarium and keep your plants healthy.

Step 4. Add soil

Place a layer of soil down next.  Be sure to get the appropriate type of soil depending on the variety of plants you are using.  Add enough soil so the plant roots will have plenty of room to grow. Aim for a depth slightly greater than the height of the plant’s pot.

Step 5. Plant Away!

When taking plants out of their original containers, you will want to break off all the old soil clinging to the roots.  Feel free to trim some of the roots back as they will grow back new and healthy.  Continue placing your little plants in the container while trying to avoid placing them near the edges of the container.  Once your plants are inside, pack them down with more soil, so they are sturdy in the dirt.

Step 6.  Accessorize!

Get creative – add decorative twigs, rock or moss to complete the look.

Step 7. Clean and Water

You can clean the dirt off the sides of your terrarium and give it a fresh spritz of H20.  Just a few sprays of water should to the trick – enough so the dirt is damp to the touch.  Watering every other day or when the dirt looks dry should be plenty for the plants.

If you’re really feeling crafty, check out these pieces of jewelry made of living plants!

Stephanie & Jarrett – The Bradford Estate

Stephanie was so much fun to work with. Her designs definitely reflected her sweet personality. Stephanie loved succulents, so we added a few into her mix of hydrangea, roses, tea roses, eucalyptus, and sweet touches of silver brunia pods. She rented our “Welcome to our wedding” chalk sign, which added a cute personalized touch to their ceremony entrance. We couldn’t of imagined a happier couple, and we wish them all the best!

Photo credit: Atlas Wedding Photography 

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Quinn & Brian -Franklin Institute

Franklin Institute- Frog Commissary Catering

Quinn & Brian had gorgeous weather for a rooftop ceremony overlooking the city sky.  The Franklin Institute is a truly unique event space. Quinn loved classic white flowers, hydrangea, tea roses, garden roses, dahlias and snapdragons but she wanted to add lots of texture with greens, thistles and plum tones. The centerpieces vases were mixed metals, mercury, gold and silver to add interest to the room.

Thank you Caitlyn Scott Photography for the amazing photos!

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Caroline & Tom at Brandywine Manor House

We are so happy to have been a part of such a wonderful wedding! Brandywine Manor House is such a fantastic venue and we couldn’t of asked for a happier couple!  Best wishes to Caroline and Tom for a wonderful life together!
Thank you to Aaren Lee Photography for sharing these beautiful photographs with us!
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Rustic Glitz Wedding – Maggie & Dane

Maggie and Dane hosted a great wedding in Chestnut Hill at The Cricket Club Philadelphia. The vibe was laid back but elegant and their event style was Rustic with a splash of Glitz.  The flowers chosen were simple and classic whites using hydrangeas, garden tea roses, queen anne’s lace, accent foliage and a few gray succulents to add interest.
 We incorporated a lot of special details into this wedding to decorate the cricket clubs four rooms and fireplaces. We used tree slices, wooden table numbers, and lots of candles and a touch of glam with the glitzy gold sequin runners.
We created custom chalk signs for the event. Starting in the main entrance we had a hand scripted seating chart and a welcome sign with their initials. In the cocktail space we had a sign directing people to the Photo Booth with our prop signs and also Instragram sign with their custom hash tag.
We are so happy to have been a part of such a wonderful wedding!!
Congratulations Maggie & Dane!
Thank you to Ralph Deal for sharing these beautiful photographs with us! www.ralphdeal.com
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Happy Spring Weddings!

With Spring only 10 days away, we thought we would share some seasonal wedding inspirations!

 

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White and lavender lilac, white roses, dusty lavender roses and eucalyptus, create a rustic garden style bouquet that smells fabulous!

 

 

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A bold, bright combination of anenomes, ranunculus, dahlias and colorful seasonal accents, make the perfect bouquet to create a “pop” of color against the bride’s dress. Perfect for pictures!

 

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This is a sweet garden bouquet featuring ranunculus, anenomes and fever few, in soft shades of peaches and white.

 

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Succuluents add an interesting texture to any bouquet.  These gray-green succulents create a subtle contrast against the yellow craspedia.  The white ranunclus, fever few and ivory stock, soften the colors with accents of seeded eucalyptus.

 

 

What are some of your favorite spring flowers?

Dish Gardens

 

Dish gardens are a cool alternative to potted plants and, unlike actual gardens, can be kept indoors and moved around. A dish garden is a small garden of flowers with similar light and watering needs grown in a shallow bowl. The bowl doesn’t need to be large; a 6” diameter bowl will do the trick.

Flowers such as succulents, shamrocks, cacti, flame violets, and club moss make excellent choices for a dish garden. Just be sure to check and see which plants work well being close together. If one plant requires a lot of water and the plant next to it doesn’t require any, you’re going to have a problem deciding how to water your garden. Some plants need more light than others, some plants need a dryer environment than others. But when you find the perfect combo, you can create a beautifully lush, mini garden.

While dish gardens are generally low maintenance, some care is needed to ensure your garden’s survival. First, find a place in your home with the appropriate environment and lighting. If the plants in your garden like lots of sunlight, keeping the dish in a window that receives a lot of daylight is ideal. If your plants like cool, dim atmospheres, place the dish somewhere out of direct light in a room where the temperature stays relatively cool.

Most garden dish plants don’t require much water. If your dish doesn’t drain, over watering can drown your plants or cause rot on the roots. Depending on the plants, a 6” dish will only require about a cup of water every week. An 8”-10” container may require up to 2 cups while a 12”-16” container may need up to 4 cups. However, the best way to tell if your plants need water is simply to check the dryness of the soil. Stick your finger or a pencil about an inch into the soil. If it feels damp or the pencil comes out dark from being wet, then the plant is fine. If the soil is dry and your plant doesn’t like dry soil, water it. It’s as simple as that.

Dish garden plants do continue to grow, but at a slower rate especially if you nix the fertilizer. If the plants extend too far beyond the dish, you can gently trim them back with a sharp pair of scissors.

With the proper care and handling your dish garden can live a long, healthy life.

Dish gardens also make excellent gifts; they are beautiful, low maintenance and last long after they are given.

Air Ferns and Other Plants that Don’t Require Frequent Waterings

When Denise suggested that I write a post about air ferns, my first thought was, “what’s an air fern?” Well it just so happens to be the little plants hanging in the front room of our shop that I see every single time I work. I just never knew what they were. Well, what they are is something really special: a parasite. Now, I know most people associate “parasites” with little evil bugs that bite our pets and family and make us sick. This plant does need a host plant to latch onto but it is not malevolent. In fact, it’s a really fascinating plant. It comes in various shapes and sizes and blooms at different times of the year. The most amazing thing about the air fern (also known by it’s botanical name as Tillandsia) is that it doesn’t need soil. In fact, the moisture contained in soil is likely to provide the fern with too much water causing it to die prematurely. The air fern only needs a quick and occasional misting. Since the fern doesn’t need soil, it can grow almost anywhere. Place the ferns in bubble bowls, crates, mason jars, anywhere you can think of, or hang them from wires. Just be sure to include a host plant such as Spanish or fresh sheet moss. You can decorate your air fern display with rocks, sand, and sea glass, to name a few.

Flower expert J. Schwanke says that the best environment for an air fern is in a bubble bowl with Spanish moss set on a windowsill with indirect sunlight.

The air ferns decorating the front of the shop are for sale. They are excellent for people who want a low maintenance plant that can be customized to fit their own personal style.

Other plants that require little water are perennials such as echinacea, lavender, and daylilies and annuals such as marigolds, zinnias, and cosmos. Orchids also require just a little water on their roots about once a week.

Succulents are another plant that can survive on little water. In fact, overwatering is one of the main causes of succulent fatality. During the summer, you can generously water the plant, just be sure to allow enough time for the soil to dry between waterings so that the roots don’t begin to rot. During the winter, however, you only need to water them every other month.

If you’re not sure about how to care for a plant, ask someone from your local garden center or flower shop who can give you specific directions based on the type of plant and the environment that you live in.

 

-Lacey Bouchard

Lisa & Joe – May 2013

Congratulations to another wonderful couple, Lisa & Joe!  These two lovebirds tied the knot in front of the coy pond at their home in  Medford, New Jersey!

When we met with Lisa she was so sweet and super excited to choose her flowers!

These lovely photos were provided by Gary Schempp Photography – he does really great work!

http://www.philadelphiaeventphotographer.com/

 

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Lisa chose a delicious blend of oranges, pale yellow and pinks with touches of lime green and succulents to accent.

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Lisa’s bouquet was made of pink peonies, orange roses, pale yellow lisianthus, green viburnum and succulents.

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We wish you two all the best, and please keep in touch!

Succulents

Botanically known as Echeveria the Succulent Rosette or Hens and Chicks are great texture to incorporate into your wedding flowers. The color hue can vary from lime to gray with a hint of plum purple. They range in size from 1” to as large as 4” across.

And Here’s Some Good News… They are super cool and available all year long!!

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We have been placing these in bouquets and also to scatter into a table design or on a wedding cake… instead of the usual roses. For weddings this element will add a unique flair!!

If you dare to be different for your wedding flowers…this could be what you are looking for!!

 

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Succulents can make such beautiful centerpieces!  Try clustering them in little dishes or loose on the table.  Add some elegant illumination to your event with votive candles.

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A pair we have come to know and love is succulents and moss!  They can create a lovely tablescape!

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Call us today to schedule an appointment; we love talking succulents!!

(856)547-1090

400 Amherst Road

Audubon, NJ 08106

http://www.leighflorist.com

 

sales@leighflorist.com

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