History of Boutonnieres

It’s no secret that most men aren’t really into flowers, especially wearing them. However, did you know a boutonniere is historically the manliest thing you are wearing as you walk down the aisle? If you’re the groom or even a groomsmen, you may be wondering about the flowers you may have to wear on the special day. You may feel silly wearing a flower especially if it’s a girly color like pink, but think about the big picture and how it connects you to your beautiful bride. It ties the two of you together in a special way on your wedding day.

If you read our History of corsages blog then you got a glimpse of where the boutonniere tradition comes from but let’s expand! Some believe that this tradition goes back to ancient Egypt and the Aztecs. They would wear certain colored blossoms to show their support for players who participated in sporting events.

Others believe that the tradition came from the battlefields of the civil wars in England where the bloom or bloom color signified friends or enemies from each other. Boutonnieres didn’t become popular on lapels until the early 19th century when fashions began to change. Bigger coats that folded over revealing the inside of a buttonhole, creating a lapel didn’t become popular until this time.

It is said that boutonnieres became popular for special occasions because flowers provided a perfume effect, warded off evil and disease.

Typically, the boutonniere the groom wears should be a bit different from that of his groomsman. Sometimes they are a fuller design or even a different flower of the same color. The blooms should be pinned to the left lapel of the tux or suit jacket. A good jacket will have a sturdy buttonhole to support the weight of the flower. Some flowers are heavier than others so you will need to make sure it is secured correctly. Most of the time the grooms boutonniere will match the bride’s bouquet and pull them together for a picture perfect look.

Boutonnieres by Leigh Florist

 

A Fairy Tale Wedding

Alli & Brett’s Wedding

Venue: Moorestown Community House

Photographer: Anchor and Veil Photography

This fairy tale starts with a ring and ends with a gorgeous celebration! This wedding was so much fun, beautifully executed at Moorestown Community House with Vitarelli’s catering. The event was filled with special details, lush garden blooms and market lights.

Hydrangea

If you have been invited to a wedding in the past couple of years, chances are you have seen the hydrangea flower in either the wedding centerpieces or even in bridal bouquets. If you are big on the meaning of flowers, hydrangea means love and admiration, making it a sought after flower by brides to-be.

Hydrangea was first cultivated in Japan, but they have recently found fossilized hydrangea in North America dating back millions of years. Hydrangea was not seen in Europe until the 18th century when a colonist brought the North American hydrangea plant over to England.

Today, hydrangea mainly grows in the Americas. Big hydrangea heads are many smaller blooms clustered together. The little star-shaped flowers grow along wooden stems and create a big, pompom shape, making them very versatile and very easy to use in arrangements.

The most common color of hydrangea is white, but they also come in a variety of colors; such as blue, red, pink, or purple. In hydrangea varieties, the exact color often depends upon the acidity or alkalinity of the soil. Acidic soils produce blue flowers, neutral soils produce pale cream petals, and alkaline soils result in pink or purple. They can also change color, or be bi-colored. All depending on how acidity is added or removed from the soil. Hydrangea is available all year round, making it great for any occasion you would like to celebrate!

Some brides often worry that if they choose hydrangea for their wedding flowers it will wilt easily.  If your florist sources the hydrangea from top quality sources and hydrates each bloom properly, you will have nothing to worry about.  They are a beautiful flower that will compliment any wedding arrangement.

Take a look at a past wedding we created which included hydrangea in the wedding bouquets and wedding centerpieces.

Wedding Roses

May of 2017 at the Abbie Holmes Estate in Cape May Court House, NJ.

Photos By: Jessica Cooper Photography

The Abbie Holmes Estate is the perfect setting for weddings with its beautifully manicured gardens and natural surroundings it is sure to make your wedding memorable.

The bride’s bouquet consisted of a gorgeous combination of peach and lavender roses in a small cascade shape. Her bridesmaids carried a small bouquet of similar colors consisting of white hydrangea, peach roses and small purplish blue accents. Having more white in the bridesmaids bouquets allowed the flowers to really pop against their dresses and the opposite effect for the bride in her stunning white gown.

Jessica Cooper Photography

The Anemone

The Anemone is a beautiful classic flower that has many uses from bridal bouquets to everyday centerpieces. The genus Anemone consists of 120 species of perennial flowering plants, which grow from tubers. Anemones grow wild in many European countries, North America, and Japan. The name Anemone is of Greek descent and roughly means wind flower because it’s the wind that opens them up. They were also once used for medical purposes as well. They have been known to help treat cramps and emotional distress.

The anemone comes several different colors such as red, pink, magenta, purple and blue, but the white anemone has proven most popular.

When it comes to wedding flowers the anemone is mostly used in the bridal bouquet. With its pure white petals and deep black center it creates a classic look on its own. You can also create a more dramatic look depending on what other flowers you pair them with. These flowers are typically available from October to May, only two of the major wedding months. If this is a flower you love and would like to incorporate into your wedding be sure to consider your time frame. Check with your local florist to inquire about their availability, and color options.

Dusty Miller

Dusty Miller is a white plant which looks like it has a dusting of snow on its leaves, hence the name Dusty Miller. Dusty miller is native to the Mediterranean coast.  Some varieties of Dusty Miller, have tiny yellow flowers that bloom from it stems, but the flowers are not considered show worthy.  The real star is the plant itself.  This attractive plant is long lasting and drought resistant.  It will leave your garden bed gorgeous all summer long.  It can handle the heat, but it prefers the shade that the afternoon brings.  There are many varieties of dusty miller. Here are a few of the more well-known varieties.

 

  1. The first is “Silver Dust”. It has silvery white foliage with a finely trimmed edge, as its name implies. It grows 12 to 18 inches tall. Silver Dust is often planted with annuals in containers and flowerbeds, making the color contrast striking.

 

  1. The second, is “Silver Lace”. It has decoratively cut, lace-like leaves. It does not grow as tall as other forms of Dusty Miller. It grows only 6 to 8 inches tall. “Silver Lace” is the most delicate-looking of common dusty millers.

 

3. The third, is Cirrus. Unlike its counterparts, Cirrus has less finely cut leaves.  Its dusty covered                    leaves are a bigger and bolder.  They are used in garden beds as ground coverage.  They only grow between 6 to 8 inches tall.

 

Dusty Miller is a beautiful foliage that is used in wedding bouquets and centerpieces.  It gives the bouquets a very soft, romantic look.

Congratulations Alex and Mike!

Our lovely couple, Alexandra and Mike, were married at the Woodcrest Country Club in Cherry Hill, NJ.

She loved a very natural look for her flowers and decor.  The florals included whites, touches of blush peach, pale blue and pops of raspberry tones.  Her bouquet featured, hydrangea, dahlias, hypericum berries, spray roses and interesting textures like thistles and scabiosa.

Check out the photographer’s blog for some awesome photos!  Shilliday Photography captures such beautiful photographs!

Here are a few snap shots from the blog:

Photo Credit: Shilliday Photography

Photo Credit: Shilliday Photography

The perfect bouquet for the perfect wedding dress

Ashley Gerrity Photography

We asked our lead wedding designer for advice on how to select the perfect bouquet for your wedding day.

Q: What is the biggest factor when choosing a bridal bouquet?

The wedding dress is a big factor for how a bridal bouquet should be styled.

Is your dress a ballgown style? A classic round bouquet may look the best with that type of gown.

For a mermaid or trumpet dress, a classic round bouquet or a cascade bouquet would look stunning.

The A-line dress has the most versatility.  There are many bouquet styles that would work well with this dress.  A romantic garden style, classic round, or cascade bouquet would perfectly compliment your dress.

A bohemian wedding dress would look beautiful with a romantic garden bouquet or tear drop shaped bouquet.

Fit and flair is a more modern cut.  The best bouquet shape to accentuate that dress would be a classic round or tear drop bouquet.

Q: Does the bride’s height and stature play a role in choosing the bouquet?

The bride’s height and stature plays a big role in the bouquet choice and size of the bouquet.  We want to accentuate your dress.  Our bouquets are customized to each of our brides to best coordinate with their uniqueness.

Q: Does the color of the wedding dress affect the color of the bridal bouquet?

Yes, the color of the bride’s dress does have an influence on the bouquet colors.  For example, if you have a nude or champagne toned dress, we suggest using neutral color blooms in champagne, nude tones, and pops of rich bold tones to bring it all together.  We will guide you through the process of selecting the best complimenting blooms for your bouquet.

Q: If the wedding gown has lace, rhinestones, pearls or metallic threading, how do you incorporate them into the bouquet?

Oftentimes, we will accent the bouquet handle with accents from a bride’s dress.  You can line pearl pins of rhinestones down the bouquet candle.  Adding pearls, or rhinestones accents to flowers are a nice delicate touch.

Q: What types of bouquets do you see trending right now?

Currently we are seeing bohemian garden bouquets, are trending right now.  The gorgeous greenery, arranged with beautiful blooms make a truly romantic bouquet.

Request a consultation with one of our designers to create your perfect bridal bouquet!

Wedding Napkin Accents

Even the smallest details can really kick your wedding up a notch. A great way to add small touches to your wedding is to accent your guest place setting by incorporating flowers on to your napkins. Tucking blooms or herbs into the neatly folded napkins adds a wonderful finishing touch to your table scape.

Here are some of our favorite looks

Flower blooms: Orchids, Roses, Dahlias, Gerbera Daisy’s are all great delicate touches

Bunch of Herbs or cluster flowers: Lavender, Eucalyptus, Thyme, Rosemary, Baby’s Breath can give a nice rustic charm to your guest plates.

http://www.bridenh.com/Fall-Winter-2015/How-to-Use-Herbs-as-Wedding-Decor/

Boutonnieres

   Boutonnieres, also known as button holes, can be a single flower or cluster of delicate flowers which accent a gentleman’s lapel for a special event.  Rather than pinning the boutonniere to the lapel as we do today, many people used to place a flower into the button hole of their lapel – hence the name!

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Here at Leigh Florist, our most popular boutonniere is our garden style design which consists of a cluster of petite flowers usually tea roses, lisianthus, or ranunculus with accent greens a ribbon tie (optional).

 

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You can even use a single flower such as a rose, mini gerbera daisy, ranunculus and many other various blooms accented with greens.  Traditionally for weddings, most people match the boutonnieres to the bridal party bouquets.

mj_236 mj_162Lisa and Ed 4

But not all weddings are the same.  Some couples have thought of unique ways to make their boutonnieres stand apart from the traditional.  Many like to add little accents to their boutonniere. Here are a couple of ways wedding couples have gotten creative.

  • Keys
  • Hot peppers
  • Shot Gun Shells
  • Gears
  • Pictures
  • Clocks
  • Feathers
  • Bottle Caps
  • Guitar Picks
  • Wine Corks